Religious Holy Days


September


September 3

Pitr paksha (Hinduism)

A 16-lunar day period when Hindus pay homage to their ancestors (Pitrs), especially through food offerings.

September 7

Feast day ‘Izzat  (Baha’i)

The Baha’i calendar has nineteen months, all named after attributes of God. ‘Izzat is the Arabic word for might. The word "feast" suggests that a large meal will be served, but that is not necessary for a Bahá'í Feast. The use of the term "feast," in this case, means that the community should enjoy a "spiritual feast" of worship, fellowship and unity – although refreshments are usually available.

September 18

Adhik Maas (Hinduism)

Adhik Maas is an extra month (September 18 – October 16) in the Hindu calendar that is inserted to keep the lunar and solar calendars aligned. Seasons are based on solar months. Lunar year has 354 days and solar year has 365 days. There is a difference of 11 days between these two years. Therefore, to reconcile the difference and account for both lunar and solar years, a month (Adhik Maas) is added after approximately 32 ½ months.

September 19–20

Rosh Hashanah (Judaism)

Beginning of the Jewish New Year and first of the High Holy Days, which marks the beginning of a ten-day period of penitence and spiritual renewal.

September 26

Feast day Mashíyya  (Baha’i)

The Baha’i calendar has nineteen months, all named after attributes of God. Mashíyya is the Arabic word for will. The word "feast" suggests that a large meal will be served, but that is not necessary for a Bahá'í Feast. The use of the term "feast," in this case, means that the community should enjoy a "spiritual feast" of worship, fellowship and unity – although refreshments are usually available.

September 28

Yom Kippur (Judaism)

The “Day of Atonement” marks the end of the Ten Days of Penitence that began with Rosh Hashanah. A day to ask God for forgiveness for sins and to secure fate. The holiday is observed by fasting from just before sunset until just after nightfall.